Multimedia Producer

The Organic Food Debate

Researchers at Stanford University released a report in September 2012, saying there was “little evidence of health benefits from organic foods.” But a day of reporting at the Chavez Farmers’ Market in Sacramento revealed that many farmers and shoppers believe the study misses the point.

Meet DJ Fonzzilla

“I got passion for music.” Alphonso “Deejay Fonzzilla” Reduta Tacdol, Jr., 28, has been deejaying since his teens. The Philippine-born music lover earned his nickname for his huge appreciation for a wide range of music styles. In this vignette, he talks more about music appreciation and the inspiring career of the late, great Francis M., the Philippines’ first famed rapper. Check out the rest of this series.

Being Filipeanut-American

Can a young San Francisco-born man find his Filipino roots, and channel his frustrations via hip-hop? by Angela J. Bass Amateur rapper Albert Balbutin, Jr., 27, regrets that he wasn’t raised speaking Tagalog or knowing much about his Filipino heritage beyond its colorful cuisine. It wasn’t until 2003, when he pledged a Filipino fraternity at San Francisco State University, that he finally got the Philippine national anthem, “Lupang Hinirang,” down pat. Not long after, his mother suffered a stroke that sent her back to the warmth and tranquility of her native Bohol province in the Philippines. Crushed, Balbutin dropped out of school. “I just didn’t care anymore after that,” he says, sitting at a table in a Subway sandwich shop in Daly City on a mid-October evening. Still starving for knowledge and the knack to convey it to others, Balbutin threw himself into studying, exploring and defining his Filipino identity. And hip-hop became the tool he used to share the gamut of his newfound knowledge. Like Balbutin, thousands of Fil-Am youth in the San Francisco Bay Area have used the elements of hip-hop to explore both the Filipino and American sides of their culture and identity. Although the Bay Area […]

B-girling in a B-boy’s World

Meet Pinay b-girl Sharon "Shaboogie" Mendoza, 35. The San Diego native moved to the Bay Area in 1998 to get down on its famous dance floors. As the mother of a 10-year-old daughter, Mendoza struggles to find time to practice her b-girling skills, a must for any breakdancer who expects to be taken seriously in the game.

Meet Emcee Nomi

Meet MC Nomi, aka Mario de Mira, 30, of Filipino rap group Power Struggle. The Nigeria-born, Minnesota-raised artist moved to the Bay Area in 2004. He performs around the Bay with his group and he works as an organizer at the Filipino Community Center (FCC) in San Francisco, specializing in employee rights and hip-hop workshops for youth. In this video, he discusses the cross between hip-hop and community organizing.

Filipino Folklore Art Grips the Bay

Hip hop culture has beckoned legions of Filipino Americans in search of identity and belonging to its creative forefront. Stay tuned for an in-depth print story, documentary photo essay...
ECHO Emily Allen

The Baltimore Sun: Camp Preps Girls for Health Careers

Ashley Jones was set on becoming a professional soccer player, but by the end of a summer health camp for teens, she was chasing a career in nursing. Jones, now 21, participated in the first annual Camp ECHO (Exploring Careers in Healthcare Organization). The five-day summer immersion program is now in its sixth year at Saint Agnes Hospital. It exposes Maryland high schoolers to the many sides of the health-care profession.

Activist Mama CoAtl on Femicide

Aired on KPFA Saturday Evening News, November 24, 2007. The United Nations implemented UNiTE to End Violence Against Women as a call to action against violence towards women and girls everywhere. The action was prompted by the 1960 murders of three anti-government activists in the Dominican Republic: the Mirabal sisters.

Protestors Oppose U.S. Support for Pakistan Regime

Aired on 94.1 FM KPFA, Saturday Evening News, November 10, 2007. Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf, Friends of South Asia, Act Now to Stop War and End Racism, and concerned citizens rallied today in front of San Francisco’s City Hall. The groups were protesting the imposition of Martial Law in Pakistan and what they say is the U.S. government’s support of military dictatorship there. They also gathered to show solidarity and support for Pakistan’s pro-democracy movement. The day of action featured speeches from community leaders and a rally.

Students, Citizens Confront Global Warming

Aired on 94.1 FM KPFA, Saturday Evening News, November 3, 2007. On November 3, organizers across the country showed the world that they will hold their politicians accountable for global warming. Participants sent more than 14,000 messages to members of Congress and presidential candidates, inviting them to attend a Step It Up rally. Students at U.C. Berkeley gathered on campus to show their support.

Daughters and Moms Share Business Success

Sipping imaginary tea and locking horns over un-heeded weekend curfews is over for mother-daughter duos Liz and Julie Stevens, Paula Stewart-Felix and Kishna Suterfield, and Jacalyn Evone and Nicole Scott. Together they've successfully turned a lifetime of shared experiences into partnerships steeped in the love, trust, and friendship of the mother-daughter bond.